Holes - Louis Sachar
Being completely entrenched in my year as a student teacher, the only literature I have time for right now is children’s lit. This novel kept popping up in classes and online resources so I decided to give it a try. I was not disappointed! I can see so much teaching potential with it too :) Much more interesting than some of the dry material available for novel studies that’s for sure. And although it’s written for children I think it can still hold the attention of adults.

Holes - Louis Sachar

Being completely entrenched in my year as a student teacher, the only literature I have time for right now is children’s lit. This novel kept popping up in classes and online resources so I decided to give it a try. I was not disappointed! I can see so much teaching potential with it too :) Much more interesting than some of the dry material available for novel studies that’s for sure. And although it’s written for children I think it can still hold the attention of adults.

Speaking From Among the Bones - Alan Bradley
Book 5 in the Flavia de Luce series, I just can’t get enough! The character. The language. The chemistry! So good. I’ve commented on this series before so I won’t say much more here. This is just one of those series that was so easy to get into and I get so caught up reading each book that it goes by so quickly and I’m always left wanting and waiting for the next one.

Speaking From Among the Bones - Alan Bradley

Book 5 in the Flavia de Luce series, I just can’t get enough! The character. The language. The chemistry! So good. I’ve commented on this series before so I won’t say much more here. This is just one of those series that was so easy to get into and I get so caught up reading each book that it goes by so quickly and I’m always left wanting and waiting for the next one.

The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared - Jonas Jonasson

What could a 100 year old man possibly get up to when he disappears from the Old Folks Home? Little do we know Alan Karlsson has spent most of his life moving from one adventure to the next, and he’s not about to let a little thing like age stop him now.

This was a far-fetched but fun story that was really easy to get into and full of witty humor. I especially enjoyed that Alan remained politically neutral throughout the novel - despite getting involved with major political players.

Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore - Robin Sloan
What a fun read! Mr. Penumbra’s is not your typical bookstore as Clay quickly finds out. As his curiosity becomes the best of him he uncovers a mystery that goes back more than 500 years and he uses his tech savvy to solve this puzzle with the help of some friends. Full of humour and a feeling of adventure, this novel is a perfect combination of the old (books) and the new (technology).

Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore - Robin Sloan

What a fun read! Mr. Penumbra’s is not your typical bookstore as Clay quickly finds out. As his curiosity becomes the best of him he uncovers a mystery that goes back more than 500 years and he uses his tech savvy to solve this puzzle with the help of some friends. Full of humour and a feeling of adventure, this novel is a perfect combination of the old (books) and the new (technology).

prettybooks:

MaddAddam, the last book in the trilogy, will be published in September!

Excited! I’ve been waiting for this one

(Source: nothingbutnovels)

(Reblogged from prettybooks)
Breakfast of Champions - Kurt Vonnegut Jr.This is my first Vonnegut novel, and was told that Breakfast of Champions is a good one to start with since it is one of the least dark and twisty of his works.  This novel is not about telling a story or making a point, but is rather therapeutic writing; a tool the author used to unload his mind. Because of this, we get the gist of the story pretty quickly, and the bulk of the novel is tangential thoughts.  He touches on a lot of social issues that I found very relevant to today, 40 years after publication.  It took me some time to wrap my head around this novel as a whole and I’d like to give it a reread sometime.

Breakfast of Champions - Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

This is my first Vonnegut novel, and was told that Breakfast of Champions is a good one to start with since it is one of the least dark and twisty of his works.  This novel is not about telling a story or making a point, but is rather therapeutic writing; a tool the author used to unload his mind. Because of this, we get the gist of the story pretty quickly, and the bulk of the novel is tangential thoughts.  He touches on a lot of social issues that I found very relevant to today, 40 years after publication.  It took me some time to wrap my head around this novel as a whole and I’d like to give it a reread sometime.

noseinabook:

YA Books For Gryffindors

I found this one the hardest to do. I tried to show different types of bravery and not just the Katniss and Tris kind. Like, the bravery to be yourself when it might be difficult, the bravery to keep going when things are hard or the bravery to do what’s right. See all four houses here

(Reblogged from noseinabook)
Animal Farm - George Orwell
Reflecting events of the Russian Revolution and the Stalin era, Animal Farm addresses themes such as corruption, indifference, greed, and ignorance in government. It was Orwell’s wish to “expose the Soviet myth in a story that could be easily understood by almost anyone…” and I certainly think he succeeded. 
I feel as though my impression of this novel may be a bit lacking. It feels difficult to relate to, being of a different generation. It seems a fantasy to me, instead of a reflection on true events. But I live in a world where we have access to the internet which, if you know to look for it, is generally more critical than mainstream media. And this is what I took away from this novel - to be a critical thinker and always search out the truth to protect ourselves, our family, and our way of life.

Animal Farm - George Orwell

Reflecting events of the Russian Revolution and the Stalin era, Animal Farm addresses themes such as corruption, indifference, greed, and ignorance in government. It was Orwell’s wish to “expose the Soviet myth in a story that could be easily understood by almost anyone…” and I certainly think he succeeded.

I feel as though my impression of this novel may be a bit lacking. It feels difficult to relate to, being of a different generation. It seems a fantasy to me, instead of a reflection on true events. But I live in a world where we have access to the internet which, if you know to look for it, is generally more critical than mainstream media. And this is what I took away from this novel - to be a critical thinker and always search out the truth to protect ourselves, our family, and our way of life.

(Reblogged from teachingliteracy)
(Reblogged from mentalflossr)